Rolls at Trapper’s Sushi are known for being more than a mouthful, including these rolls topped with spicy scallops and spicy crab. Sue Kidd Staff file, 2013
Rolls at Trapper’s Sushi are known for being more than a mouthful, including these rolls topped with spicy scallops and spicy crab. Sue Kidd Staff file, 2013

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Sue Kidd has the latest South Sound restaurant news, with openings & closings, recent reviews and more.

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2 more Trapper’s Sushi restaurants opening in the South Sound

May 17, 2016 05:00 AM

UPDATED May 20, 2016 10:27 AM

Trapper’s Sushi is opening two more of its fusion sushi restaurants. The first will open in Bonney Lake, the second in Parkland.

That will bring the sushi company’s total to 10 restaurants, with half in Pierce County and the other half in the greater Puget Sound area.

There’s already a Trapper’s restaurant in Bonney Lake, you say? That’s right. The original Trapper’s opened as Sushi Town by owner Trapper O’Keeffe in 2004 (it later changed its name to the same name as the other locations).

The new Trapper’s Sushi in Bonney Lake will open in the former Granny Sue’s Pizzeria — the same shopping center as the original Trapper’s.

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Expect a menu quite similar to the other Trapper’s, which specializes in fusion maki rolls sporting robust flavors and myriad toppings

The original Trapper’s Bonney Lake space will remain in the Trapper’s company, but will become a new restaurant, Trapurito’s.

Trapurito’s will switch to a fast-casual style of ordering at the counter with a seat-yourself dining room. The menu will shift from Trapper’s usual menu of sushi rolls to a sushi mash-up featuring sushi burritos and tacos, said O’Keeffe by phone.

The Bonney Lake Trapper’s opening in the old pizza restaurant will be O’Keeffe’s biggest.

“The wait’s going to be shorter because it’s a lot bigger,” said O’Keeffe, noting that the original Trapper’s outgrew its small space long ago. He added, “It’s a little bigger than the Kent Station Trapper’s,” which previously was his largest. He expects there will be 115-120 seats at the Bonney Lake Trapper’s.

Expect a menu similar to the other Trapper’s, which specializes in fusion maki rolls sporting robust flavors and myriad toppings. (They’re three-bite rolls, not diminutive slices like those found at a traditional Japanese restaurant, such as Tacoma’s Fujiya). The restaurant follows a Guy Fieri-esque bigger-is-better mantra with ingredients piled high on rolls featuring raw and cooked fish. As O’Keeffe told me in 2009, “A lot of traditional sushi can be intimidating for first-time (sushi eaters).” His chain’s focus is on making sushi approachable for every diner.

The new Bonney Lake Trapper’s will open around mid-summer. Trapurito’s will open a few weeks after that.

As for the Parkland Trapper’s, that project comes with a longer timeline. “We’re in the permitting process now,” said O’Keeffe. That restaurant will be about 100-105 seats. It will be located inside Garfield Station, the retail-residential-academic complex near Pacific Lutheran University.

It will have a menu similar to the other Trapper’s locations, with a full cocktail menu in addition to beer and wine (the Bonney Lake location also will come with a full bar).

Expect an opening around September for the Parkland Trapper’s Sushi.

Trapper’s Sushi

Information: trapperssushi.com.

Opening mid-summer: Bonney Lake Trapper’s, with the original location becoming Trapurito’s.

Opening around September: Parkland Trapper’s.